Northwood Area Land Management Collaborative

2012 Events

Michael CadutoAn Afternoon with Michael Caduto, February 25, 2012
Northwood Community Center

On Saturday, February 25, the extraordinary story-teller, naturalist and author Michael Caduto joined members of the NALMC extended family at the Northwood Town Hall (“Ho!” “Hey!”). In the afternoon, in front of a back-drop mural of a birch bark Abenaki dwelling, to the accompaniment of guitar and drum and turtle-shell rattle, Michael told and sang, for the young people, wonderful local Native American stories having to do with peoples’ and animals’ relation with each other, and with the land. And after a book signing and potluck supper he spoke with the adults, and some children, about the natural life at the edges of rivers – the riparian borders – and how they are best maintained as habitats for fish, plants, trees and animals. It was an outstanding and exhilarating experience for us.
Thank you, Michael Caduto! Ho! Hey!

For more information about Michael Caduto please visit his website www.p-e-a-c-e.net.


Maple Potluck3
Photo courtesy of Joe McCaffrey.

2nd Annual Maple Syrup Potluck, March 10, 2012
Peck’s Farm, Blakes Hill Road

Though March 10th was rather chilly, everyone who attended the second annual NALMC sapping party at the Peck Farm seemed to be warm and friendly. There were about fifteen people who came to stand amongst the sweet smelling steam and watch the sap boil down into syrup. Everyone brought something delicious to eat and Byron cooked hot dogs in a pan of sap for anyone who wanted to try one. Those proved to be a big hit!

Byron talked everyone though the sapping process from the collecting of sap from the trees to the finished product, maple syrup. He was able to finish off the sap into syrup while everyone watched. Everyone was given their own small jar of fresh, warm syrup to take home. It was nice being able to meet some new people, reconnect with others that attended last year and to have some of our neighbors drop by for good conversation, good food and some sweet maple syrup.

-Kathryn Peck 3/14/2012

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Controlled Burns2Controlled Burns & Fire Management Workshop, March 26, 2012
Harmony Hill Farm, Northwood

With winds gusting up to 35 miles per hour, firefighters from Northwood, Epsom, Pittsfield, and Strafford worked together on a cold spring evening to burn a 23 acre field at Harmony Hill Farm as part of a controlled burn demonstration. There were approximately 40 firemen present at this training event organized by NALMC. Methodically, they burnt the field in sections, always going against the wind so they would be burning into an area with a ‘black line’ of previously burnt grass.

This demonstration provided important training for the firefighters and was quite educational for landowners and bystanders. In a culture taught by Smokey the Bear about the dangers of forest fires, it is easy to forget that fire and ash can be good for the environment. For example, areas of Mount Major in Alton that were burnt in a forest fire a few years ago are now lush and green in comparison with the overgrown woods that had been protected from the fire. In cases like these, fire starts a regenerative process to revitalize old fields and forest land.

We would like to thank the fire departments who put on this demonstration and showed us the value of controlled fire.


Aldo Leopold Day 2012, May 5, 2012Aldo Leopold Day5
Camp Wah-Tut-Ca Scout Reservation, Northwood

All programs are free and open to the public

Wah-Tut-Ca Scout Reservation
292 Blakes Hill Road
Northwood, NH 03261

Directions: From Epsom Traffic Circle travel 6.2 miles east on Route 4, turn right on Blakes Hill Road, follow 1.4 miles, Wah-Tut-Ca Scout Reservation is on right. Follow gravel driveway about 1/4 mile down hill into camp parking area.

From Lee Traffic Circle travel 13.3 miles west on Route 4, turn left on Blakes Hill Road, follow directions above.

Agenda: Unless indicated otherwise, most events in Robinson Lodge – Dining Hall

1:00 – 1:30 pm: Welcome to Wah-Tut-Ca Scout Reservation and NALMC Neighborhood and to Leopold Day

1:30 – 3:30 pm: EXPLORE!

  • A nature hike to explore the camp (led by naturalists and Scout leaders)
  • Leopold bench building (led by Steve Winchester and Carl Wallman) – MaGee Shelter
  • Land Health writing workshop (led by poet Sharon Olds) – Williams Lodge
  • UNH Woodsmen Team demonstration – across from dining hall
  • Activities for kids (led by Nikki Roy)

3:30 – 4:00 pm: Refreshments in the Dining Hall

4:00 – 5:30 pm: CONNECT!

Aldo Leopold DayA presentation and interactive discussion by Leopold scholar, Dr. Julianne Lutz Warren: “Aldo Leopold’s Bias for Pine Trees: Writing the Signature of Land Health”

Dr. Warren is the author of Aldo Leopold’s Odyssey and a faculty member at New York University. Her work unfolds Leopold’s journey to better understands of harmonious human-nature relationships.

Optional kids’ activities (outdoor campfire)

5:30 pm: SHARE!

Community potluck supper – In the spirit of the land ethic, please bring a dish to share and your own place setting

6:30 pm: Screening of documentary film, Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time

Sponsored by:
Northwood Area Land Management Collaborative, NH Fish and Game Department, Wah-Tut-Ca Scout Reservation, Friends of Northwood Meadows State Park, and Bear-Paw Regional Greenways

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Bench DistributionLeopold Bench Distribution, June 7, 2012
Northwood Meadows State Park, Northwood

The Leopold Benches that we made during the workshop last fall, have finally found homes. With help from the Friends of Northwood Meadows State Park and other volunteers, benches have been placed along the foot paths in the Park.

“Part of the concept behind the workshop was to work as a community, using community based products, to provide a product that goes back into the community. Concepts like this go a long way providing educational experiences about natural resources and local forest products.

Northwood Meadows State Park would be the perfect home to several of these benches. The benches are a symbol of what the park represents. They are all natural, created from local forest products, and will one day bio-degrade returning nutrients back into the soil.”

-Bryan Comeau
Forestry & Wildlife
N.H.DRED, Forests & Lands
South Region

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